Last updated on October 10th, 2019 at 07:09 am

Dear job seeker,

I will keep this page short and to the point. Here’s what I have for you today:

Medical Receptionist Guide Cover

In the eBook, you will find multiple great answers to each of the following questions:

  • Why do you want to work as a medical receptionist?
  • What do you consider your greatest weakness as a medical receptionist?
  • What are your expectations on doctors and other staff at this healthcare facility?
  • How do you imagine a typical day in work?
  • On a scale from 1 to 10, how would you rate an importance of a receptionist, if we talk about overall impression of a patient/guest?
  • Imagine that one of the patients tried to start relationship with you. What would you do? How would you react?
  • If a patient accused you of a bad service, what would you do?
  • Tell me how you organize, plan, and prioritize your work.
  • Describe a time when you struggled to communicate something to your boss, colleague, or to a patient/customer. How did you manage to get your message over?
  • What have you found to be the best way to monitor the performance of your work?
  • … and 15 other tough questions you will likely face in your interview for a job of a medical receptionist.

Check the sample below to see how this eBook can help you:

 

Sample from the eBook


Question: What do you consider your greatest weakness as a medical receptionist?

Hint: You have a few options for a good answer to this question.

First one is saying that you believe to have no significant weaknesses as a receptionist—and that’s exactly the reason why you chose your profession. However, you should always elaborate on such an answer. Mentioning some weaknesses you have outside of the job of a receptionist is a good idea.

Second option is choosing a weakness that matters (such as average communication skills or lack of computer skills, struggling to organize your daily work, etc). You should elaborate on your answer even in this case, ensuring the interviewers that you are aware of your weaknesses, and try to improve on them.

The third option, a rather creative one, is saying that you can’t really tell and have to do the job for a few weeks to see in which areas you’d struggle. You should add something again, saying that you are sure you’ll struggle in some areas, but believe in your ability to learn and improve in your job…

 

Sample answers

– I do not want to sound overconfident, but I do not think I have any real weakness as a receptionist. My leadership skills are rather bad, and I struggle with physical labor, but these things aren’t really important for a good medical receptionist… at least in my view they aren’t important.

– I believe that I can improve on my communication skills. There are moments when I just can’t find the right words, or forget to keep an eye contact with the person I talk to. I am aware of this weakness, and try my best to improve on my communication skills.

– I would also love to know the answer to your question. This is my first job application in the field. I believe in my abilities and I studied the job description carefully, but only time will tell whether I struggle with something in work. If I do struggle, I will try my best to improve on my weaknesses.

 

Question: If a patient accused you of a bad service, what would you do?

Hint: You can start your answer saying that you believe it won’t happen often, since you try your very best in work, being attentive to the needs of all patients.

Of course, however, the situation is not entirely in your hands, and some patients may accuse you of a bad service, simply because they have a bad day, or feel sick, or whatever.

You should be ready to face such a situation, and ensure the interviewers it won’t affect you in a negative way. It’s important to not take their remarks to heart, and have empathy for their suffering and feelings.

You can also suggest that you would never argue with a patient.

 

Sample answers

– First of all, I really believe it won’t happen often. I want to do my job responsibly and stay attentive to patients’ needs, in all circumstances.

If it happened, however, I would try to find a reason for their behavior and remedy the situation. And I would not take their accusations personally. I understand that people suffering from various medical conditions may find their ordeal unbearable, and may vent their anger on anyone, including the receptionist. This is just a part of the job and we have to count with it…

– I would apologize. I would ask them what I could have done better, and try my best to remedy the situation. But of course I understand it won’t always be possible to satisfy each patient.

If four people stand at my desk, waiting, the phone keeps ringing and basically the workload is heavy, you just can’t satisfy everyone, and people have to wait for a few minutes, or even for longer. This just belongs to the job, and though I plan to carefully listen to the feedback form the patients (they can be right, after all), I will not take their bad words personally.

 

Question: On a scale from 1 to 10, how would you rate an importance of a receptionist, if we talk about overall impression of a patient/guest?

Hint: Each person is important; each person plays their role and has an impact on the overall impression of a patient. Good receptionist can neither make, nor break a healthcare facility. The receptionists are important, but they can not make the right diagnosis, encourage a patient who’s scared of certain treatment, or administer an injection in a gentle and human way.

Other staff members are responsible for these duties, and receptionist do not have any control over them…

On the other hand, receptionists answer phone calls from both outside and inside the healthcare facility, and they are the first and the last persons patients typically talk to.

A good applicant for this job should be aware of the importance of their role. Don’t hesitate to choose ten out of ten, showing the employers that you approach your job responsibly, and believe in a value a good receptionist can bring to the place.

 

Sample answers

-I would say ten. Receptionist is the first and the last person patient talks to, often even before they visit the practice. If they make a good first impression, the life of other staff members will be much easier. Definitely they play a huge role.

– I believe that everything has to be perfect in an excellent medical center. From start to finish. From receptionist, through nurses and assistants, to doctors… Everyone needs to do their job exceptionally, so the patients have no reason to complain. Oppositely, they’d come back again and they’d spread a good word about the facility. But I will still rate an importance of a receptionist as extremely important, and I plan to approach my job in the same manner.

End of the sample


 

These were just three questions, and not the most difficult one. You will find 25 in the eBook, including tough behavioral questions, with multiple answers to all of them…

But that’s not all.

To ensure you will get the job, I included in the book six principles you need to understand before you can ace this interview.

Without talking too much about them, let me show you another sample from the book:

 

Sample no. 2


Principle no. five: Show your willingness (or even your eagerness) to learn, and adapt

It would be a mistake to claim that you were ready to start the job without any training. That you simply want to walk in, sit at the computer, and start doing everything receptionists typically do…

Medical receptionists work with all kinds of specialty software—for scheduling, filling insurance forms, etc. Unless you had this job before, you hardly have experience with the software.

And nobody expects you to have the experience!

What is more, many healthcare facilities have certain rules in place, precise regulations that suggest how you should do your job, from greeting the patient to taking a payment from them and saying goodbye.

They want the patients to have certain “customer experience”. Obviously you will learn all these things, either from some working manuals, or from your more senior colleagues who will show you how to do the job.

But first of all you must be willing to do so…

Therefore it is crucial  to show your willingness to learn, and follow their way of doing things—at least at the beginning.

I am sure you have some creativity in you, and will bring some good ideas to the table later on, ideas on how to do your job more effectively, to greater satisfaction of both doctors and patients.

But at the beginning it’s all about learning and following their ways. Please, keep it on your mind when………

End of the sample


Matthew Chulaw, author of the eBook

Matthew Chulaw, author of the eBook

So that’s it. I do not want to waste your time with lengthy sales pages, fake reviews, or imaginary discounts, just like other people do on their websites, while selling various digital products.

You have read the samples, you know what the eBook is about, and surely you can tell whether it will help you.

I sincerely believe it will. And you can read it easily in two or three hours, it’s 11,000 words. Only things that truly matter, no secondary content.

Plus, of course, like with everything else we sell here on InterviewPenguin.com, you have a risk free sixty days money back guarantee. If you don’t like this eBook for any reason, or no reason at all, just let me know (email me at matthew[at]interviewpenguin[dot]com) within 60 days and we will give you a full refund.

Quick Summary

Medical Receptionist Guide Cover

  • Brilliant answers to twenty-five difficult questions you may get in your interview for a medical receptionist job.
  • Published in 2019.
  • Several sample answers to each question, so you can choose one that reflects your values and experience.
  • Six principles of acing the interview, things you simply need to know in order to make the right impression on your interviewers.
  • Instant download, .PDF format (you can read it on any device (mobile, kindle, PC), and you can easily print it).
  • Secure and simple checkout with PayPal, you can pay with your credit/debit card, or with your PayPal account.
  • Price: $19.75, one time payment, no hidden fees or upsell (you will make it back in first two hours in your new job).
  • 60 days risk free money back guarantee. Sold exclusively on InterviewPenguin.com.
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Your interview does not have to be stressful, or difficult. You can interview with confidence, and give brilliant answers to all tough questions. Download the guide today, and succeed in your interview for medical receptionist job.

Sincerely,

Matthew Chulaw,

Your personal job interview coach

P.S. Feel free to send me a message if you are still not sure how this guide will help you to get a job, or if you have any questions. I try my best to answer all messages within twelve hours (matthew[at]interviewpenguin[dot]com). Thank you!

Matthew Chulaw

Matthew has been working in international recruitment since 2008. He helps job seekers from all walks of life to pursue their career goals, and to prepare for their interviews. He is the founder of InterviewPenguin.com website.
Matthew Chulaw

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